Digitally Challenged!

Friday, 30 November 2018

Speaker: Mel Turner

Lecture title: Digitally Challenged!

Lecture Summary

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Mel Turner

Mel Turner has been using, programming and dealing with computers for more than 50 years; almost as long as the mainstream use of computers in general. This lecture will describe the advances over the history of his career in both the private and public sectors. From mainframes in the 60s to iPhones and iPads today, Mel has had both a career and a hobby exploring this field that changes constantly and continues to challenge us all in our everyday lives.

 

Slides: Digitally Challenged

 

Bio: Mel Turner

Mel Turner
Mel Turner

Mel Turner graduated in Physics at the University of London (England) in 1966 and has been involved in Information Technology throughout his career. Starting with IBM as a programmer, Mel came to Canada in 1968 and worked in the public service and in the private sector before cofounding a software company in the 80s. He returned to Statistics Canada in the 90s and completed his career in 2006 managing the Informatics Branch. He continues to program as a hobby and busies himself in retirement with maintaining websites and volunteering technical support to local groups.

 

My Puppet Passion

Friday, 28 September 2018

Speaker: Noreen Young

Lecture title: My Puppet Passion

Lecture Summary

puppeteer-noreen-young-with-only-a-fraction-of-her-creationsTo have a professional career doing the things that you love to do is truly a gift in life. I count myself so fortunate that I was given that opportunity.

A career in television puppetry is admittedly unusual.  People are curious because the don’t know a lot about puppetry and I’m often asked, ‘How did you get started?’

Come and find out   Let me tell you about the different types of puppets there are and the type of puppet that I like to make and perform with.

There are tales to tell about the television shows I worked on like Hi Diddle Day,  Sesame Park, Readalong, Today’s Special, The Noddy Shop, Under the Umbrella Tree and others.  What goes on behind the scenes?  How do you prepare and produce a TV show with puppets?

And let me tell you about my latest project – a puppet opera!

Bio: Noreen Young

Noreen Young
Noreen Young

As award-winning puppeteer and puppet builder, Noreen Young has been involved in numerous television productions during her long career, most notably, “Under the Umbrella Tree”, a children’s series that ran on CBC, The Disney Channel and Canal Famille, and which is now streaming on YouTube at CBC’s Encore.

Noreen was Artistic Director for Puppets Up! International Puppet Festival which ran in Almonte for 12 years from  2005 to 2016.  She was instrumental in bringing many professional puppet troupes from around the world to perform in our town.

In 1995, Noreen was awarded The Order of Canada for her contribution to puppetry and children’s television.

Born and raised in Ottawa, Noreen now resides in Almonte.

Slides: Noreen Young Gallery

Canadian Women: Musical pioneers

Friday, 26 April 2019

Speaker: Elaine  Keillor

Lecture title: Canadian Women: Musical pioneers

Lecture Summary

womenInMusicI suspect that you, like most of us who took music lessons, had a woman as a teacher. Teaching music was one of the few professions a woman could follow. Frequently she could pursue teaching in the family home and thus manage to look after children and household duties at the same time. In this presentation, I wish to tell stories of pioneering Canadian women who pursued musical careers as composers, opera singers, instrumental performers, and even conductors. They prepared the ground for the blossoming of female song-writers, composers, and performers after 1950.  Thus, today we are not surprised to see Tania Miller conducting the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra.

Bio: Elaine Keillor

Elaine Keillor
Elaine Keillor

Elaine Keillor, C.M.for over six decades held the record for being the youngest to ever receive the ARCT degree, She went on to pursue a performing career as pianist and collaborative musician throughout Canada and in the United States, Europe, and Asia. After being the first woman to obtain a PhD. in musicology from the University of Toronto, she taught at several universities including Carleton. Her research largely focussed on Canadian music and as a musician, she endeavoured to bring alive particularly the compositions produced by women. For more on her research and performing career, consult www.elainekeillor.ca

 

Radiation and Human Health

Friday, 25 January 2019

Speaker: Don Wiles

Lecture title: Radiation and Human Health

Lecture Summary

nuclear-wasteHumans have been exposed to nuclear radiation for millions of years and seem to have survived. Illustrations will be given to show how radiation can interact with human flesh and how the effects can often be counteracted.  Some examples of extreme cases will be given.  Current evidence indicates that there is a lower limit, below which radiation is not harmful.  In fact, small animal research indicates that below the safe limit radiation is actually beneficial to human and animal health.  Finally, a summary will be given of my own exposure to radiation, including my own gamma-ray spectrum

Bio: Don Wiles

Don Wiles
Don Wiles

Starting in Port Hope Ontario, I became exposed to large doses of radiation, and ingested considerable quantities of radium-226.  I also got a ‘radium burn’ on two fingers.  At MIT, I was useful in helping to calibrate a device for measuring radon in human breath.  Somehow I have survived.

 

Social Enterprises: What are they and why do they matter?

Friday, 29 March 2019

Speaker: Edward Jackson

Lecture title: Social enterprises: What are they and why do they matter?

Lecture Summary

week-11-social-enterprise-with-marcus-coetzee-6-638A social enterprise is a commercial business that sells products and services that improve the well-being of citizens, especially those facing social or economic challenges.  A mobile money platform in Asia priced for low-income customers, a home renovation company employing ex-convicts in an inner city, a rural ecotourism operation that treads lightly on the earth—these entities take many forms around the world and are attracting young people seeking to align their values with the way they make their living. Social businesses often benefit from grants from governments or foundations; is such support fair or effective?  Do these organizations displace private entrepreneurs? In general, why do they matter?  How can the value and scale of social enterprises be maximized to the benefit of Ontario towns?  And what is needed to make that happen?  This talk will draw on experience with social enterprises from around the world and will focus in on businesses and strategies that are relevant to Eastern Ontario.

Bio: Edward Jackson

Ted Jackson
Edward Jackson

Ted Jackson is a professor, consultant and author who advises foundations, development agencies, universities and governments on social enterprise, impact investing, local economic development, program evaluation and campus-community partnerships.  A former tenured faculty member in public policy and an associate dean (research and graduate affairs) at Carleton University, he is currently president of E. T. Jackson and Associates, a consulting firm, and evaluates programs on youth employment, small-business financing, and international scholarships in North America, Africa and Asia.  Born in Ottawa, he spent his high school years in Kemptville, where he played Junior B hockey, basketball, football and fastball.  He is a volunteer with youth projects in Ottawa and Kingston and serves on the boards and committees of several international-development non-profits.  His other interests include golf, fitness, travel, jazz and poetry—and two young grand-daughters.

 

Hazardous Conditions: Histories of the Urban Horse

Friday, 26 October 2018

Speaker: Joanna Dean

Lecture title: Hazardous Conditions: Histories of the Urban Horse

Lecture Summary

horse-and-buggy-drawing-11What was it really like to share city streets with animals that weighed half a ton and did not always do as they were told? The number of horses in Canadian cities skyrocketed in the late 1800s, when they pulled buggies, hauled carts and streetcars, and powered treadmills, lifts, and brick machines. In 1891, Ottawa had one horse for every 18 people. In this lecture, I will tell stories from the archives about the mishaps, cruelty and muck of a multispecies city. I will explain what horse manure had to do with the spread of tetanus, or lockjaw, and how an ungainly little horse called Brick Top helped Canadians overcome this dread disease during the First World War.

Bio: Joanna Dean

Joanna Dean
Joanna Dean

Joanna Dean was inspired as a child by Dr. Dolittle, and has never entirely given up trying to talk to the animals. She shares her farm in rural Quebec with Wyatt, a draft horse, Paddy, a paint, and a multitude of other animals. She teaches animal history and environmental history at Carleton University, and recently co-edited Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada (2017).

 

Exploring the Heritage Waterways (the most expensive way to get to Ottawa)

Friday, 28 April 2017

Speaker: David and Alison Burkett

Lecture title: Exploring the Heritage Waterways (the most expensive way to get to Ottawa)

Lecture Summary

Come hear the story of a 68-day boating adventure. Follow Dave and Alison on their boat “Grand ‘Scapes”, as it journeys from Georgian Bay, through the Trent-Severn Waterway, into Lake Ontario, Thousand Islands and the Rideau Canal to Ottawa, visiting with family and friends along the way. It wasn’t just a physical journey – it ended with a major lifestyle decision for them.

Learn about the mechanics of the lock system, marine navigation, the geographical environment, the wildlife and their personal experiences living in 235 sq. ft.  Dave is an amateur photographer, so you will see stunning photos of the trip as you follow them on their 1200 km voyage.

PresentationHeritageWaterways.

David and Alison Burkett

Retired management consultants and longtime residents of the Kitchener-Waterloo area, Dave and Alison bought a 31’ powerboat the summer of 2009. After 7 years boating in Georgian Bay, they decided to take this once-in-a-lifetime trip last summer. They now reside in Almonte.