The Evolution of Canada’s National Park System

Friday, 31 January 2020

Speaker: Gerry Lee

Lecture title: Then, Then and Now: The Evolution of Canada’s National Park System

Lecture Summary

From its inception in 1885, Canada’s National Park System has taken many turns on the path to maturity, turns that have altered its purpose, its size and its politics. Prior to the 1930 Natural Resource Acts [ which gave provinces control over their natural resources], National Parks could only be created on federally-owned lands. Also prior to 1930, federal parks were more often referred to as Dominion Parks, Forest Parks, or simply Parks. It took the passage of the National Parks Act, also in 1930, to officially coin the term “National” and state the purpose for which they were created. Politics, at either the federal or provincial level, have played a significant role in the final selection of new park areas, but new methodologies developed in the 60s have added more objectivity to the process, replacing the Park descriptor “outstanding” with “representative”. Being a part of this evolutionary process was both professionally and personally exciting and rewarding, not the least of which was the field work part. Some field anecdotes will be shared re the life of a new park planner.

Material:

  1. System Planning timeline_2019
  2. Then, Then and Now

Bio: Gerry Lee

Gerry LeeGerry Lee graduated from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) 1964-1968 with a Masters in Forestry, minor in Wildlife Management.  He joined Parks Canada in 1965 as a new park planner, doing boundary and resource studies for Gros Morne (Nfld), Nahanni (NWT) and Kluane (Yukon) plus co-authored Park Systems Planning Manual and initiated a National Wild River Study, forerunner of the Heritage Rivers Program.  Gerry joined the Lands Directorate in 1974 as Chief, Federal Land Services, then moved to his final position as Chief, Habitat Conservation, Canadian Wildlife Service.  Retired in 1996, he served on the Wildlife Habitat Canada Board and Ontario’s Fish and Wildlife Heritage Commission as well as Michigan’s School of Natural Resources Board of Governors (2 terms).  Currently, he spends about four days/week year-round at his forest property on Indian Creek, Pakenham Twp., managing a wildlife-focused woodland.

Electron Microscopy: A Small Talk

Friday, 28 February 2020

Speaker: Jeff Fraser

Lecture title: Electron Microscopy: A Small Talk

Lecture Summary

In this talk I will explore a short history of Electron Microscopy (EM), the various types of Electron Microscopes, examples of peripheral instruments important to electron microscopy and most importantly the impact that this discipline has had on my life as I fell into a world that I had no knowledge of.

I will speak briefly on Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Focused Ion Beam Microscopy (FIB) but the main emphasis of the talk will be my area of expertise, Scanning Electron Microscopy. (SEM). I will explain the physics of how they work, advances in the field EM and how they are utilized on a daily basis in manufacturing and academic research.

A picture (or in this case, a micrograph) is worth a thousand words. So  the talk will have many thousands of words in the form of images from different scientific disciplines and everyday life.

Slides:

Electron Microscopy

Bio: Jeff Fraser

Jeff FraserJeff Fraser graduated from Fanshawe College with a three year diploma in “Science Laboratory Technology”. Majored in Microbiology and Biochemistry.

Work experience included 2 years with 3M Canada as a quality-control supervisor, 9 years with Fiberglas Canada in the Physical and Advanced Research department where I first used a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 26 years with the National Research Council in various portfolios performing Electron Microscopy analysis for scientific staff and outside contracts. Retired in August 2015 but still works at NRC under contract

What makes a city age-friendly?

Friday, 25 October 2019

Speaker: Louise Plouffe

Lecture title: What makes a city age-friendly?

Lecture Summary

Major global trends in this century include the aging of the population and urbanization.  However, most cities and towns are built to accommodate a working age-population and their families, with little thought of the growing numbers of increasingly older persons with a wide spectrum of physical and cognitive abilities. In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO) undertook to identify the key features that make a city ‘age-friendly’ and to mobilize municipal governments, older persons and community groups to change their cities and towns in that direction. Starting with consultations in 33 cities in 22 countries, the age-friendly city concept has since evolved into a world-wide network.  In Canada alone, over 1000 communities in all 10 provinces have joined  the movement, including Mississippi Mills.  In this presentation, you will learn from the WHO project leader how the ‘age-friendly’ idea became a global tipping point in urban planning.

Slides: Age-friendly Communities

Bio: Louise Plouffe

Louise PlouffeLouise Plouffe (Ph.D., Psychology) has extensive experience in leading policy research and analysis on health and social dimensions of aging within Canada and internationally, notably with the Government of Canada, the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Longevity Centre (ILC) Brazil and ILC Canada.  She developed the conceptual framework and led the consultations which launched the global WHO Age Friendly Cities initiative.  Louise has contributed to the expansion and evaluation of Age Friendly Cities within Canada, and most recently, was actively engaged locally in the implementation of Age Friendly Ottawa.  She has published and presented widely on age-friendly communities and cities in Canada and internationally. Louise has received the Contributions to Gerontology Award from the Canadian Association on Gerontology as well as a Knowledge Translation Award from the Public Health Agency of Canada.