The Evolution of Canada’s National Park System

Friday, 31 January 2020

Speaker: Gerry Lee

Lecture title: Then, Then and Now: The Evolution of Canada’s National Park System

Lecture Summary

From its inception in 1885, Canada’s National Park System has taken many turns on the path to maturity, turns that have altered its purpose, its size and its politics. Prior to the 1930 Natural Resource Acts [ which gave provinces control over their natural resources], National Parks could only be created on federally-owned lands. Also prior to 1930, federal parks were more often referred to as Dominion Parks, Forest Parks, or simply Parks. It took the passage of the National Parks Act, also in 1930, to officially coin the term “National” and state the purpose for which they were created. Politics, at either the federal or provincial level, have played a significant role in the final selection of new park areas, but new methodologies developed in the 60s have added more objectivity to the process, replacing the Park descriptor “outstanding” with “representative”. Being a part of this evolutionary process was both professionally and personally exciting and rewarding, not the least of which was the field work part. Some field anecdotes will be shared re the life of a new park planner.

Material:

  1. System Planning timeline_2019
  2. Then, Then and Now

Bio: Gerry Lee

Gerry LeeGerry Lee graduated from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) 1964-1968 with a Masters in Forestry, minor in Wildlife Management.  He joined Parks Canada in 1965 as a new park planner, doing boundary and resource studies for Gros Morne (Nfld), Nahanni (NWT) and Kluane (Yukon) plus co-authored Park Systems Planning Manual and initiated a National Wild River Study, forerunner of the Heritage Rivers Program.  Gerry joined the Lands Directorate in 1974 as Chief, Federal Land Services, then moved to his final position as Chief, Habitat Conservation, Canadian Wildlife Service.  Retired in 1996, he served on the Wildlife Habitat Canada Board and Ontario’s Fish and Wildlife Heritage Commission as well as Michigan’s School of Natural Resources Board of Governors (2 terms).  Currently, he spends about four days/week year-round at his forest property on Indian Creek, Pakenham Twp., managing a wildlife-focused woodland.

Electron Microscopy: A Small Talk

Friday, 28 February 2020

Speaker: Jeff Fraser

Lecture title: Electron Microscopy: A Small Talk

Lecture Summary

In this talk I will explore a short history of Electron Microscopy (EM), the various types of Electron Microscopes, examples of peripheral instruments important to electron microscopy and most importantly the impact that this discipline has had on my life as I fell into a world that I had no knowledge of.

I will speak briefly on Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Focused Ion Beam Microscopy (FIB) but the main emphasis of the talk will be my area of expertise, Scanning Electron Microscopy. (SEM). I will explain the physics of how they work, advances in the field EM and how they are utilized on a daily basis in manufacturing and academic research.

A picture (or in this case, a micrograph) is worth a thousand words. So  the talk will have many thousands of words in the form of images from different scientific disciplines and everyday life.

Slides:

Electron Microscopy

Bio: Jeff Fraser

Jeff FraserJeff Fraser graduated from Fanshawe College with a three year diploma in “Science Laboratory Technology”. Majored in Microbiology and Biochemistry.

Work experience included 2 years with 3M Canada as a quality-control supervisor, 9 years with Fiberglas Canada in the Physical and Advanced Research department where I first used a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 26 years with the National Research Council in various portfolios performing Electron Microscopy analysis for scientific staff and outside contracts. Retired in August 2015 but still works at NRC under contract

We have seen the media and it is US!

Friday, 29 November 2019

Speakers: Edith Cody-Rice and Brent Eades

Lecture title: We have seen the media and it is US!

Lecture Summary

Why do news organizations report news the way they do? It is because that is what we will read, listen to, watch or pay for. This lecture will start with a short history and explanation of the Millstone, Mississippi Mills’ online community newspaper and will move to a modest proposal for the survival of community newspapers. Discussion with then turn to media today, including a short primer on the principles of international and national public broadcasting and the difference between broadcasting and newspapers.

Slides: We have seen the media!

Bio: Edith Cody-Rice

Edith Cody-RiceEdith Cody-Rice is the publisher of the local online newspaper the Millstone and was a media lawyer for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for 29 years. Specializing in journalism law, she spent her career helping journalists get their stories to air and avoiding reputationally damaging and costly defamation lawsuits. She assisted in crafting stories and appeared many times in court to battle publication bans and to defend journalists against libel  allegations and efforts to reveal their sources. She still is involved in journalism through the Millstone and as a director of the Michener Awards Foundation. The Michener Foundation awards the most prestigious Canadian award for investigative journalism which is presented by the Governor General each year.

Edith is also very involved in literature and ran literary luncheons at the National Arts Centre for 19 years, was a director and chair of the Writers’ Trust, and a founder of the Ottawa Valley Book Festival as well as a director of the Ottawa International Writers’ Festival

Bio: Brent Eades

Brent EadesBrent Eades has worked in corporate communications since 1985, when he joined the Prime Minister’s Office as a writer. He was later an aide to the federal minister of finance. He began building websites in 1995, and since 1998 has worked in communications at the Bank of Canada. He is also the publisher of the Almonte.com website. Brent joined the Millstone in 2012 and is now its editor-in-chief. He is on the board of the Michener Awards Foundation, which presents Canada’s most prestigious journalism prize.

Canadian Women: Musical pioneers

Friday, 26 April 2019

Speaker: Elaine  Keillor

Lecture title: Canadian Women: Musical pioneers

Lecture Summary

womenInMusicI suspect that you, like most of us who took music lessons, had a woman as a teacher. Teaching music was one of the few professions a woman could follow. Frequently she could pursue teaching in the family home and thus manage to look after children and household duties at the same time. In this presentation, I wish to tell stories of pioneering Canadian women who pursued musical careers as composers, opera singers, instrumental performers, and even conductors. They prepared the ground for the blossoming of female songwriters, composers, and performers after 1950.  Thus, today we are not surprised to see Tania Miller conducting the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra.

Bio: Elaine Keillor

Elaine Keillor
Elaine Keillor

Elaine Keillor, C.M.for over six decades held the record for being the youngest to ever receive the ARCT degree, She went on to pursue a performing career as pianist and collaborative musician throughout Canada and in the United States, Europe, and Asia. After being the first woman to obtain a PhD. in musicology from the University of Toronto, she taught at several universities including Carleton. Her research largely focussed on Canadian music and as a musician, she endeavoured to bring alive particularly the compositions produced by women. For more on her research and performing career, consult www.elainekeillor.ca

 

Social Enterprises: What are they and why do they matter?

Friday, 29 March 2019

Speaker: Edward Jackson

Lecture title: Social enterprises: What are they and why do they matter?

Lecture Summary

week-11-social-enterprise-with-marcus-coetzee-6-638A social enterprise is a commercial business that sells products and services that improve the well-being of citizens, especially those facing social or economic challenges.  A mobile money platform in Asia priced for low-income customers, a home renovation company employing ex-convicts in an inner city, a rural ecotourism operation that treads lightly on the earth—these entities take many forms around the world and are attracting young people seeking to align their values with the way they make their living. Social businesses often benefit from grants from governments or foundations; is such support fair or effective?  Do these organizations displace private entrepreneurs? In general, why do they matter?  How can the value and scale of social enterprises be maximized to the benefit of Ontario towns?  And what is needed to make that happen?  This talk will draw on experience with social enterprises from around the world and will focus in on businesses and strategies that are relevant to Eastern Ontario.

Slides: Social Enterprises

Bio: Edward Jackson

Ted Jackson
Edward Jackson

Ted Jackson is a professor, consultant and author who advises foundations, development agencies, universities and governments on social enterprise, impact investing, local economic development, program evaluation and campus-community partnerships.  A former tenured faculty member in public policy and an associate dean (research and graduate affairs) at Carleton University, he is currently president of E. T. Jackson and Associates, a consulting firm, and evaluates programs on youth employment, small-business financing, and international scholarships in North America, Africa and Asia.  Born in Ottawa, he spent his high school years in Kemptville, where he played Junior B hockey, basketball, football and fastball.  He is a volunteer with youth projects in Ottawa and Kingston and serves on the boards and committees of several international-development non-profits.  His other interests include golf, fitness, travel, jazz and poetry—and two young grand-daughters.

 

Women’s Health in Africa

Friday, 22 February 2019

Speaker: David Caloia

Lecture title: Women’s Health in Africa

Lecture Summary

RobertOmandiBefore starting my practice in Almonte, I spent several years serving as an obstetrician-gynaecologist in Kenya in a partnership programme with the University of Toronto. My talk will recount some of my most memorable experiences there and discuss some of the challenges facing women’s health in Africa.

Slides: Women’s Health in Africa

 

Bio: David Caloia

DavidCaloia
David Caloia

Dr. Caloia is an Almonte physician specializing in obstetrics and gynaecology. He has been practicing in Almonte since 2015.

Radiation and Human Health

Friday, 25 January 2019

Speaker: Don Wiles

Lecture title: Radiation and Human Health

Lecture Summary

nuclear-wasteHumans have been exposed to nuclear radiation for millions of years and seem to have survived. Illustrations will be given to show how radiation can interact with human flesh and how the effects can often be counteracted.  Some examples of extreme cases will be given.  Current evidence indicates that there is a lower limit, below which radiation is not harmful.  In fact, small animal research indicates that below the safe limit radiation is actually beneficial to human and animal health.  Finally, a summary will be given of my own exposure to radiation, including my own gamma-ray spectrum

Slides: Radiation and Human Health

Bio: Don Wiles

Don Wiles
Don Wiles

Starting in Port Hope Ontario, I became exposed to large doses of radiation, and ingested considerable quantities of radium-226.  I also got a ‘radium burn’ on two fingers.  At MIT, I was useful in helping to calibrate a device for measuring radon in human breath.  Somehow I have survived.